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Forgotten Wrecks of the First World War

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Download: PowerPoints

We have a number of PowerPoints on case study wrecks and topics related to the Forgotten Wrecks of the First World War available for download. You can preview them here, or click on the link below each preview to download and see accompanying notes.

The War at Sea

The maritime war was what made the First World War truly global conflict. Despite the range of nations from every continent involved in the war, actual extent of conflict was quite narrow, mostly in Europe. 


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Southampton at War

Since the 1860s Southampton had been the principal military port and had worked effectively during the Boer Wars. With the London to Southampton railway line opening in 1840 and the Docks opening in 1842, Southampton had excellent transport links and by 1846 was known as “The Gateway to the Empire”.  It was no surprise, therefore, that Southampton would play the lead role in supplying the First World War as Number 1 Port.

It must be remembered however, that Southampton’s contribution to the war was not solely maritime. Throughout the city, people were engaged in other essential war work.  The people of Southampton kept the city functioning, with many women employed in traditionally male roles. The many memorials around the town commemorate the City’s losses.


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HMHS Lanfranc

The subject of this PowerPoint is the Lanfranc. Built in 1906 in Dundee as a Passenger/cargo vessel, Lanfranc was requisitioned in 1915 for war duty and converted to a hospital ship. Having assisted in the evacuation of troops from Gallipoli, HMHS Lanfranc transported the wounded back from Le Havre to Southampton. Lanfrac was torpedoed and sank on the 17th April 1917.

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Airship SSZ15

The subject of this PowerPoint is Airship SSZ15, assembled at the Royal Navy Airship Station (RNAS) at Mullion, Cornwall and trialled on 10th August 1917. Historical records show that the airship flew for 215 hours during 1917 and 195 hours in 1918 before being lost at sea, with the loss of all 3 people on-board on 13th April 1918.

 

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HMT Warilda

The subject of this PowerPoint is HMT Warilda, built in 1912 as a passenger/cargo vessel, used as a troop transporter in 1914 and a hospital ship in 1916 and torpedoed in the middle of the English Channel, between Le Harve and Southampton, with tragic loss of life in August 1918.

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